Tag Archives: Articles in Decoded Pregnancy

A Pair of Articles about Math for Pregnancy

Do you ever ask “What are the chances?” about ectopic pregnancy? Does everyone have the same risk?

Or did you just learn that “embryonic age” is different from “gestational age”, and wonder how to convert one number to another?

This month I’ve written two articles for my series in Decoded Pregnancy about those topics.

"Valentine Day on a Calendar" image by Daniel Moyle (danielmoyle)
“Valentine Day on a Calendar” image by Daniel Moyle (danielmoyle)

Converting between Gestational Age and Embryonic Age

My “Calculate Embryonic Age vs Gestational Age: Pregnancy Math” explains how to do the simple arithmetic to convert between the two.

The trick is to remember that “gestational age” is based on your menstrual cycle; most doctors are likely to use this term.

However, “embryonic age” is more accurate when you use in vitro fertilization (IVF) as a fertility treatment.

Either number helps you estimate your expected due date. But you have to know which one to use, whether you do the math by hand using a wall calendar, or find an online due date calculator.

By the way, if you are having trouble conceiving, be sure to ask your doctor whether you should be prescribed a fertility aid. Provincial health plans might cover IVF fertility treatments, but ask about IVF success rates at the clinic.

The Long Odds of Ectopic Pregnancies

My other article is “Probability of Ectopic Pregnancy: The Math Behind Atypical Implantation“.

Health officials recognize ectopic pregnancy as a remote but serious risk. In other words, it is not a likely situation; but if the embryo did not implant in the uterus, your health is at serious risk.

Health Canada includes it in the list of causes of maternal deaths, although it is far from the most frequent. (See table 2 in their site). One of the biggest problems is that your doctor may miss the diagnosis. The early symptoms may not be obvious; and it is rare enough that the symptoms really point to something else. Regardless, the best advice is to ask your doctor to do the tests.

My article explains some of the available statistics, and also how the math works when you have a conditional probability such as both getting pregnant while using an IUD birth control method, and then having an ectopic pregnancy.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.

Professional Writing by DeHaan Services

DeHaan Services writes content or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, Decoded Pregnancy and other online sites. That’s why we highlight these online articles on this blog page. If you’re interested in a writing tip based on my approach to writing these two articles, see “Developing a Pregnancy Theme“.

To only see our Toronto events (for things to do in Toronto) or fitness articles, please click on the appropriate category in the “Categories” section at the bottom of the right-hand margin.

Thank you for reading about these two articles concerning math for pregnancy.

The Canadian Chance of Being Pregnant with Twins

Am I carrying twins“?

Once you know you’re pregnant, but before your first ultrasound, you still have questions. Although multiple births are not common, being pregnant with twins is common enough that it’s a good question.

My latest Decoded Pregnancy article, “The Probability of Becoming Pregnant with Twins“, answers that question using statistics from the United States. The article also notes factors such as racial heritage, maternal age and fertility treatments as influences. Some twins develop from one fertilized egg; others from separate eggs fertilized by different sperm cells.

Quick now: what do statistics say about Canadian twin pregnancies?

The Recent Canadian Rate of Being Pregnant with Twins

"Twin Girls" : image by Ruth L
“Twin Girls” : image by Ruth L

According to UBC professor Linda G Leonard (RN & MSN), in “Twins, Triplets and More“, multiple births accounted for 3.2% of live births in Canada in 2010. “Multiple” means “two or more”, but “or more” are rare indeed.

In BC, 1 of every 32 births were twins. Only 1 of every 3,119 were “or more”: triplets or quadruplets.

That’s almost a ratio of 100 pairs twins to every trio of triplets or golfing buddies of quadruplets or basketball team of quintuplets.

Remember that these statistics cross the borders among race, age and fertility treatments. Your own chance of being pregnant with twins depends on those factors; read my Decoded Pregnancy article for those details.

More Probabilities about Pregnancy

If you’re interested in the chances of “boy or girl”, “expected height on maturity”, “eye colour” or even “what are the chances of getting pregnant”…I’ve written about those in Decoded Pregnancy, too. If you have other questions of a “how likely is…” nature, please place a question in their “Ask an Expert” section.

Are You Pregnant?

Do you know when is the time to get pregnant? Which are you most fertile days of the month? A fertility monitor lets you know your best time to conceive. In the UK, the ClearBlue Fertility Monitor kit had a perfect 5/5 review from 7 customers. The kit includes 20 fertility monitor testing sticks plus two “ultra early” pregnancy testing strips.
In the United States, the top-rated fertility monitor is also by Clear Blue; but it only earns 4.4/5 stars. You also need to buy additional testing strips. The most frugal American alternative is the “First Response Easy Read Ovulation Test 7 Tests“. It has 7 fertility test strips and one pregancy test strip. With a 3.4/5 rating, some reviewers were completely satisfied and others recommended the Clear Blue digital tests.
Canada also sells the Clear Blue Fertility Montitor when it’s in stock, as well as the testing strips. The revised book, “Taking Charge of Your Fertility” by Toni Weschler boasts a 4.8/5 rating over 238 reviews, making it a remarkably well-received paperback.

Professional Writing by DeHaan Services

DeHaan Services writes web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, and Decoded Pregnancy. That’s why we highlight these online articles on this blog page. If you’re interested in my writing tips, see my Blog of Writing articles such as “Developing a Pregnancy Theme“.

To only see our Toronto events (for things to do in Toronto) or fitness articles, please click on the appropriate category in the “Categories” section at the bottom of the right-hand margin.

Thank you for reading about the statistical chances for a Canadian pregnancy with twins.Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.

Math to Predict Height of Your Baby during Pregnancy

The third and final article in my Decoded Pregnanacy series of “mathematical baby predictors while pregnant” is “How Tall Will Your Baby Be When He Grows Up? Calculating Height Early“.

The Long and Short of Baby Height Prediction

"Tall and Short on Unofficial St. Patrick's Day" : image by quinn.anya (Quinn Dombrowski)
“Tall and Short on Unofficial St. Patrick’s Day” : image by quinn.anya (Quinn Dombrowski)

One research paper explained a statistics-based math calculation to predict “how tall will my child be?” during pregnancy.

Most other height prediction methods use the child’s height at age 2. However, Decoded Pregnancy is aimed at pregnant women.

The math to predict height is remarkably simple, even though it was based on statistical research.

Support is More Important than a Baby Height Predictor

While it’s fun to make baby predictions during preganancy, it’s more important to plan for your support during delivery and early motherhood.

Canadian women can receive non-medical support by a trained professional doula. She can provide services during pregnancy and delivery, and/or the first weeks of motherhood.

Becky Webb’s “Hiring a Doula: Benefits of Dedicated Birth Support” explains a lot more about what a doula does.

Search online for “Toronto doula” or the “Calgary doula association”, or even “What is a Doula?” to learn more.

Women who want to “mother the new mother”, as Doula CARE (“Canadian Association Registry and Education) says, should consider taking doula training and certification to pursue this rewarding career.

Recreational Predicting: Gender, Eye Colour and Height

An online “Chinese baby gender predictor” might be fun, but my articles use math and science for predicting baby’s gender, baby eye color and adult height while the mother is pregnant.

Please remember that these “predictor methods” are neither guaranteed nor foolproof; but they’re the best that modern science and math can provide to answer “how tall will my child be”, to make “baby sex predictions” or to predict baby eye colour.

Mindful Pregnancy

Amazon has a variety of journals if you want to make notes about your mindful pregnancy.

Sacred Pregnancy: A Loving Guide and Journal for Expectant Moms”  boasts the highest rating for a Kindle journal in its genre. Compare your journey to author Anni Daulter’s views of a woman’s personal development during this time.

Also with a great rating is the slightly older “The Pregnancy Journal, 3rd Edition“, by A. Christine Harris.

Professional Writing by DeHaan Services

DeHaan Services writes web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science and Decoded Pregnancy. That’s why we highlight these online articles on this blog page.

To only see our Toronto events (for things to do in Toronto) or fitness articles, please click on the appropriate category in the “Categories” section at the bottom of the right-hand margin.

Thank you for reading about math to predict the height of your baby while you’re still pregnant.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.