Tag Archives: Toronto Events Marathon

Plan B in the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

My vacation kept me from writing anything before the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon. But now that it’s over, let’s learn about Plan B.

"2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon Sign" image by Mike DeHaan
“2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon Sign” image by Mike DeHaan

Brief Summary of Results for the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

The Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon is one of the most important annual sporting events in this city. The 2014 Waterfront Marathon saw one record return to a Toronto resident; a pair of good efforts by other Canadians; wins by a Kenyan and an Ethiopian; five Guiness records; and nearly 4000 finishers in this 42.2 kilometre event.

Laban Korir of Kenya won in 2:08:15, beating Tariku Jufar by 21 seconds (or 1/2 second per kilometre) in the men’s division. Mulu Seboka of Ethiopia took the women’s division in 2:23:15 (15th place overall), beating Aliaksandra Duliba by 1:28.

Finishing between the men’s and women’s winners was Canada’s Eric Gillis, with a 2:11:21 personal best. He had hoped to beat the Canadian men’s record of 2:10:09, set by Jerome Drayton 39 years ago. Canadian Lanni Marchant finished in 2:31:06. Both Canadians qualified for the 2015 PanAm games, to be held in Toronto next summer.

The Toronto Waterfront Marathon is one of the few Canadian events to rack up world records, even if they are not “fastest in the open division”. Across both the marathon and half-marathon disciplines, the 2014 Waterfront Marathon in Toronto set Guinness World Records for a woman wearing fire-fighting gear or as a zookeeper’s uniform; men wearing baseball gear or a superhero costume; and Michal Kapral, the Joggler, added the half-marathon to his previous marathon and 10Km records for juggling 3 balls while running.

I did not find Ed Whitlock or Fauja Singh in the marathon results; I’ve written about their world records for their age categories, set here in previous editions of the Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

The Fallback for Plan B

The Toronto Star states that Eric Gillis used his fallback plan during Sunday’s race. “Plan A” was to claim the $39,000 prize for breaking Drayton’s old record. When his legs became sore, he switched to “Plan B”, which was to beat a 2:11 time. With three kilometres to run, he fell back to “Plan C”: run a personal best.

That’s a strategy I recommend to runners whom I’ve trained through the Running Room program: set a range of goals. For many of us recreational runners, “just finishing” is a worthy goal as “Plan C”. Loftier goals may include a personal best time; qualifying for Boston; or beating either a friend or the pace from a recent training run. Having a fallback Plan B truly helps keep you going through adversity.

References for This Article on the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

My congratulations to the Toronto Star for covering the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon results, as well as profiling some of the competitors in recent days. This article used “Canadian record still standing after Toronto Waterfront marathon” and “5 weird Guinness records set at Toronto’s Waterfront Marathon“.

As well, the official Canada Running Series results are online.

Looking for More Annual Events in Toronto Canada?

I often track annual Toronto events that I find interesting, free or frugal.

Disclaimer: DeHaan Services has no relationship to the organizer(s); I am not reimbursed for writing this article. However, DeHaan Services does write web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, Decoded Pregnancy and other online sites.

Click the “Toronto Events” category at the bottom of the right-hand column for recent articles in this category. Thanks!

Thanks for reading about the 2014 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

2 Signs of the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

Here’s a quick public service announcement about the upcoming 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, one of Toronto’s most important annual autumn events.

Drivers should watch for two kinds of signs warning of road closures and parking restrictions: both the old and the new.

"Old Toronto Road Closure Sign for Waterfront Marathon" image by Mike DeHaan
“Old Toronto Road Closure Sign for Waterfront Marathon” image by Mike DeHaan

The Classic Black-on-Orange Road Closed Sign in Toronto

Here we have the classic Toronto black-on-orange sign warning that the road will be closed. It’s very good at the bare facts: what street will be closed; from where to where; date and time.

It fails miserably to indicate the reason for the road closure.

Perhaps they want the colour scheme to evoke a Hallowe’en fright.

A New Sign of Hope to Celebrate the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

"New Scotiabank Toronto Waterfron Marathon Sign" image by Mike DeHaan
“New Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon Sign” image by Mike DeHaan

Now let’s check the new sign, which might belong to the organizers of the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon, rather than to the City of Toronto.

It’s bright, with a cheerful background colour compared to the old sign. It carries almost the same information; my guess is that Queen westbound will be closed to Kingston Road but eastbound only from Woodbine. On the other hand, the URL at the bottom of the sign redirects to the main page of the official Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon web site, rather than to the “road closures” information page.

The best part is that it advertises the reason for the road closure.

Your Opinions for the Road Closure Signs for the Toronto Waterfront Marathon

Are the new signs an improvement? How could they do better? Their official home page encourages you to “join the conversation” on Facebook.

Other Notes for the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

I’m really pleased that both signs were posted as early as Oct. 9, when I took these pictures on Queen Street East. In some years, the signs only went up in the final week before the Toronto marathons, so anyone who only visits an area on Sunday would be completely unaware of the road closures.

Attend the Marathon Torch Ceremony for the Waterfront Marathon

Last year, my “Special Notes for the 2012 Toronto Waterfront Marathon” reported on the Marathon Torch ceremony. This year, the Marathon Flame ceremony returns to the Alexander the Greek park on Oct. 17, 2013 at 6:30pm. Join the mayor of Marathon, Greece, Iordanis Louizos, and his torch relay runners at Logan and Danforth.

When is the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon? What Roads are Closed?

As you noted from the photographs, the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon will take place on Sunday Oct. 20. Major road closures include parts of Bay St. and University Ave. for the start; part of Bloor St. West and Bathurst; parts of Lake Shore Blvd; Queen’s Quay, Cherry St. and Commissioner’s Road in the Toronto Harbour region; Queen St. East, Eastern Avenue, and the southern end of Bayview; and Front Street. Use the above link to learn more about the Scotiabank Toronto Marathon, especially the details for the route. I didn’t try to name all the road closures; the site has the course map and a detailed list of affected roads.

Where Should I Watch the 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon?

My best advice for spectators is to position yourself at the Queen Street East bridge where King branches away. The runners pass the 35Km marker at Broadview, then burn up another 5Km in a loop along Bayview before they get to Parliament Street. Usually the strain really shows on the runners between the 35 and 39Km locations; after that, they may begin to feel relief at nearing the finish line, at the end of their 42.2Km marathon.

The runners are a bit less tired on Queen St. East between Woodbine and Beech. You can cheer each runner twice, as they run east and then double back westbound.

Check the map for the official neighbourhood cheering stations. You could get involved with them, or volunteer to hand out water. Both are great ways to watch the runners and feel involved.

With the start at 8:45am, the winning male marathon runner should break the tape at Bay and Queen (near City Hall) by 10:55am or so. Last year, Betona Warga won in 2:10, and Mary Davies in just under 2:29. (A 2:06 pace would mean running at 20 kilometres per hour; as fast as the cycling speed limit on the Martin Goodman Trail!).

Or simply check the official map and head for your most convenient location.

Remember that road closures will cause TTC detours and delays as well as blocking cars. Cyclists should avoid the routes too; the organizers try hard to keep the streets clear for the runners.

Looking for More Annual Events or a Holiday in Toronto Canada?

You can find more annual events for your vacation in Toronto Ontario; or for local residents wanting things to do in Toronto this weekend.

Ideas for a Toronto Vacation or Staycation

My blog reports on most of the annual Toronto events that I find interesting, and provides ideas for fascinating, free or frugal things to do in Toronto. I especially like to cover annual attractions and special events in Toronto Canada; but especially for Canadian holidays.

CityPASS offers discount tickets to Toronto attractions, including Metro Toronto Zoo coupons. You buy the voucher online, print it and take it to your first destination; let’s say it’s the zoo. They give you the coupon booklet but remove the Metro Toronto Zoo discount tickets. Visit the next four attractions, where helpful staff relieve your booklet of tickets but leave you with the rest of the information. You save over $40 by spending about $70. The voucher is good for almost two years, but you have to use all the discount admission tickets within nine days. This is terrific for tourists looking for multiple things to do in Toronto, or for a hometown stay-cation: use discount tickets to Casa Loma, the CN Tower, the Metro Toronto Zoo, the Ontario Science Centre and the Royal Ontario Museum in a nine day adventure. That’s five things to do while vacationing in Toronto Canada, and at a bargain price thanks to the discount coupons.

Disclaimer: DeHaan Services has no relationship to the organizer(s); I am not reimbursed for writing this article. However, DeHaan Services does write web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, Decoded Pregnancy and my Fitness and Weight Control blog. That’s why DeHaan Services highlights these online articles on this site.

Click the “Toronto Events” category at the bottom of the right-hand column for recent articles on this topic. Thanks!

Thanks for reading about the change in road signs for the upcoming 2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon.

Refresher on Setting Your Long Run Pace

Distance runners must learn to set their long run pace so they can “stay the course”. My latest DeHaan Fitness article, “Discover Your Running Pace for the Long Run“, covers that topic with a bit of research and an explanation of how I re-discovered my own pace.

"A Halifax Harrier (UK) Running past Snow" image by AdamKR
“A Halifax Harrier (UK) Running past Snow” image by AdamKR

Find and then Improve on Your Sustainable Long Run Pace

As you run longer distances, your leg muscles begin adapting so you can stay on your feet longer and go farther. But you can still tire yourself out much too quickly, by running faster than your sustainable pace.

But of course you don’t want to “run lazy”; that doesn’t seem likely to give you the training benefits.

My article explains how to set your own long run pace; at least you should discover a slow pace that you can speed up as your stamina improves.

Autumn Road Races such as the 2013 Toronto Waterfront Marathon

This may be “just in time” for people training for the autumn road race season. The highly popular “2013 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon” takes over Lakeshore Blvd (among other southern roads) on Sunday Oct. 20, 2013.

Non-runners can support charities by pledging for their favourite athletes in the Waterfront Marathon. They also need volunteers to help hand out water along the route (and many other small but vital tasks).

Ed Whitlock returns! I’ve written about him before, in “Triumph and Tragedy at the 2011 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon“. To paraphrase the Jedi master Yoda, “When over 80 years old you are, run so fast you will not”.

The route may change from year to year. I haven’t run the current route, so check their official Toronto Waterfront Marathon map before you plan where to watch. (I’d go to where King Street divides from Queen, just west of the Don River. Runners reach that location after 35Km of their 42Km race; then they go up and down Bayview for a few kilometres before resuming their run downtown. That’s about the distance where people begin to despair; they can see the downtown office towers that mark the finish, but that finish line is still out of reach).

The Toronto Waterfront Marathon is just one of many annual Toronto events that promote fitness and raise funds for charity. It truly is an autumn event, but the picture of the woman running past snow just reminds us that winter awaits.

Distance running serves as a great fitness technique. Part of the trick is learning to pace yourself. You can wear a running pace calculator in a sports watch; or simply trust what your body tells you as you run.

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Thank you for reading about setting your long run pace in time for the 2013 Toronto Scotiabank Waterfront Marathon.

Disclaimer: The information contained in this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.