Tag Archives: Articles in DeHaan Fitness and Weight Control

Why Write Two Running Tips for Cold Weather?

Why did I write “Two Cold Weather Running Tips from Two Frigid Days” in my DeHaan Fitness blog? To fill a gap I noticed in other articles on that subject!

Why should I mention that article here? Since this site promotes my writing, this lets me explain about changing my writing style for different situations.

"A Halifax Harrier (UK) Demonstrates Cold Weather Running" image by AdamKR under CC license
"A Halifax Harrier (UK) Demonstrates Cold Weather Running" image by AdamKR under CC license

Why Write a Pair of Cold Weather Running Tips?

As I explain in my DeHaan Fitness post, most of the other articles recommend “the right cold weather running gear”. That may help someone who is beginning running in winter. At that stage in my journey to fitness, I simply wore what I had. That included a cotton T-shirt, sweat pants, sweatshirt, a really old overcoat, an old toque and worn-out gloves. Now that I’ve earned some technical fabric T-shirts, and bought proper running pants and jackets, I’m much less likely to perspire heavily and then freeze.

But everyone else suggests buying the right clothing for running in the cold. So I wrote different tips for running.

My article relates two running tips for cold weather that one might not find elsewhere. Probably they have been suggested by others; but they felt rather new to me when I thought of them.

Why Publicize my Article on Cold Weather Running Tips?

As a freelance writer, my task is to convey my client’s message in a “voice” that authentically represents that person or company.

For example, a service company may want to project how helpful they are, and the results they can achieve. Perhaps each section of an article should include a “call to action”, such as “contact us to learn more”. A professional tone may be needed; or perhaps one of reassurance and comfort.

By contrast, when I write for Decoded Science, my articles blend my insight into the topic with the tone and style of that web site. Many other science articles adopt a passive voice: “The experiment was performed successfully, but significant capital expenditures were accrued”. That’s not the Decoded Science style (thank goodness!), but one must adapt to a publication’s requirements.

I’ve deliberately chosen an informal first-person voice for my DeHaan Fitness articles. That site provides some of my own views and experiences.

By contrast, the Toronto events covered in this site are usually written before the event. For example, I do not recount “what I did for March Break”; instead, my article covers what you might plan to do, locally, with your own family.

Why am I publicizing the article I wrote about a pair of tips for cold weather running? In part, to inform prospective clients that I can write in different styles. Use my contact information in the right-hand column when you need some ghost-writing for your business!

However, this publicity is also a public service announcement to other runners (and cyclists, hikers and outdoors enthusiasts) who may have the same problem as the young man I met while running in the cold the other week.

Thanks for reading about why I wrote an article with two running tips for cold weather.

Fitness with the Tortoise and the Hare

Does Aesop’s fable, The Tortoise and the Hare, actually teach us about fitness and how to pace your run? Maybe not, but it helped me put an insight into perspective in “The Tortoise and Hare Approach to Running Pace“, my latest DeHaan Fitness post.

"Rabbit foraging in Alabama" image by Stephen Kirkpatrick, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
"Rabbit foraging in Alabama" image by Stephen Kirkpatrick, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Okay, Aesop Really Didn’t Say Much about Fitness

I’d like to feel as quick as this rabbit, but as I admit in that blog post, I felt really slow at the start of that fitness session.

And no, Aesop truly did not discuss “pace” for exercising. He had a different insight about competition. Actually my blog post is about setting a wise pace early in the run. I used the “Tortoise and Hare” phrase to highlight the contrast between trying too hard versus starting with a sustainable pace.

Two Sources for Aesop’s Fables

I found a couple of good Kindle books of Aesop’s fables, in Amazon. Read them for Aesop’s wisdom on a range of subjects… or to give your children something to dream about.

Aesop’s Fables (Kindle Edition)” has a low price, and a 4-star rating from 7 reviewers. Each modernized fable has its own illustration. Check it out in the Canadian edition or the American edition.

The “Aesop’s Fables (Oxford World’s Classics – Kindle Edition)” version has a whopping 600 fables! The only review gives it 5 stars. This version has been translated anew from the Greek. It’s recommended for the parent who wants to know what the original stories really said. Check it out in the Canadian edition or the American edition.

Professional Writing by DeHaan Services

DeHaan Services writes web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, Decoded Pregnancy, DeHaan Fitness, and other sites. I also promote my articles with writing tips in my Blog of Writing site: for example, “One Writing Tip from Running with Aesop“. That’s why we highlight these online articles on this blog page.

To only see Toronto events, or only the fitness articles, please click on the appropriate category in the “Categories” section at the bottom of the right-hand margin.

Disclaimer: The information contained in these articles is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice.

Will I Benefit from Resuming Hill Training?

Perhaps it’s too obvious that I do expect to benefit from “Resuming Hill Training with Gentle Uphill Running“. My latest article in DeHaan Fitness admits that I found even a gradual but long uphill slope to be challenging, once I’d lost the discipline of regular hill interval training.

"An uphill run" image by Dawn
“An uphill run” image by Dawn

Hill Training as an Aerobic Exercise for Running Fitness

While it’s easier to regain a level of fitness than to build it up the first time, the significant benefits of regular aerobic exercise will keep me heading back to the hills for more. But for now, I’m going to concentrate on the baseline of running uphill at a gentle pace rather than pushing to my maximum aerobic limits.

And if you’re at all like me, and the other runners, cyclists and even a rollerblade enthusiast whom I saw on a bike trail along Lakeshore Blvd in Toronto today (Boxing Day 2014): take advantage of the mild weather! It’s a lot easier to exercise outdoors when the trails and sidewalks are bare of snow.

Professional Writing by DeHaan Services

DeHaan Services writes web site or advertising copy for clients. Our skills are demonstrated in online articles in Decoded Science, Decoded Pregnancy and DeHaan Fitness. That’s why we highlight these online articles on this blog page.

Thank you for reading my online articles about hill training.

Disclaimer: The information contained in these articles is for educational purposes only and should not be used for diagnosis or to guide treatment without the opinion of a health professional. Any reader who is concerned about his or her health should contact a doctor for advice. I have not received products or compensation from any brands for promoting them in this article.